Posted by: Kiki | April 29, 2009

The Kids Your Parents Warned You About

I wasn’t the nice kid in school. in fact, I was part of a group that hated the nice kids with a passion.

Where I went to school, we didn’t have a snobby elitist clique full of shiny-haired heiresses and Abercrombie-clad football stars. The popular kids were all that, don’t get me wrong. but tehy were also teh *nice* kids. The ones with school spirit. The community-minded ones who were nice to the dorky kids and tried to include everyone in their efforts. I’m sure that on Sundasys they also visited teh old folks’ homes, bringing them home-baked cookies and freshly ironed Bingo sheets.

Bleagh.

memories051

I’ve never liked being the same as others, and in high school, I went through great efforts to be different, to not fit in. I hung out with the misfits. The punks, the Goths, the gang fighters and the druggies. I dressed the part, talked the part and yes, I could even do the ass-whoopin’ part.

We were defined by being anti. Anti-school. Anti-government. Anti-good kids. We weren’t the nicest people to be around. Okay, so we were basically a bunch of jerks. We were the ones that crashed perfectly nice parties, bringing the booze and the drugs and the random acts of destruction.

And yet, people still invited us. We gave their little preppy outings an edge of danger. A hint of street cred.

As our anti attitude matured, a lot of us moved from punk and grunge to Goth. We dressed up in our weltschmerz, pretended to enjoy angsty poetry and went to clubs where everyone was as velveted up as we were. We were all proud in not showing who we really were.

I now love reading about sub-cultures in books, especially since most of them are written from the point of view of the dorky nice kids. They don’t get the “self-destructive” outcasts any more than they get the uber-popular kids.

How did you feel about the “bad” kids in high school? Did you avoid them? Did they avoid you? Do you even have bad kids at your school? Or are designer ripped jeans as bad as it gets around where you are?

What’s your worst story involving someone who deliberately tried to be disruptive or different?

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Responses

  1. Wo Kiki, you were a bad girl! Isn’t it amazing how Goths dress up to be different but really they’re dressing up like other Goths to hang out together and be the same? Normalcy is strange really.
    It’s similar to these hair styles boys have at the moment, sooo much product and hair dye and they become fluffballs and guess what? In ten years time they’ll look back and go ‘what was I thinking?’ Just like Taffeta and lace, somethings are wrong.

  2. I think that everyone wants to belong to a group, but we want to have a choice which group we belong to.
    So we choose our subculture and then work hard on being like the people in our chosen group…

  3. Kiki – I think you summed it up perfectly in your comment to Nat!

    At our school all the popular kids were pretty bad anyway and they were the ones who used to party all the time and wag school. But we were an odd mix – part goth, part Sportsgirl and part bogan. Then I turned 16 and discovered op shops and then I was part dirty old man overcoats and army pants thrown into the mix!!!!!!

  4. I think “I was part dirty old man overcoats” is a great quote. ^_^

  5. Hey, cool hair in that photo, Kiki.

    I wish I could remember outrageous stunts pulled by the bad kids at my high school. We must’ve been a fairly tame lot!

  6. I wasn’t even aware of Goths when I went to school – which I’ll get to in my post tomorrow. It wasn’t until my 20’s when I saw Winona Ryder in Beetlejuice that I thought dying my hair black might be fun. But I didn’t. I joined a coven instead. Very short-lived.

    I did have Goth sensibilities though, without the wardrobe. I was obsessed with death and the afterlife, read Sylvia Plath (had to for 3U English), though I never really got into the Goth type music.

    As for bad kids at our school, there really wasn’t any. And I’ll explain that tomorrow as well.


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